Network Service Scanning

Adversaries may attempt to get a listing of services running on remote hosts, including those that may be vulnerable to remote software exploitation. Methods to acquire this information include port scans and vulnerability scans using tools that are brought onto a system, similarly to the Active Scanning in the Reconnaissance phase.

Specifically, with access to Private Keys and Valid Accounts, adversaries will try to discover SSH Remote Services to then move laterally within the network.

Within cloud environments, adversaries may attempt to discover services running on other cloud hosts. Additionally, if the cloud environment is connected to a on-premises environment, adversaries may be able to identify services running on non-cloud systems as well.[1]

Procedure Examples

Name Description
APT39

APT39 has used CrackMapExec and a custom port scanner known as BLUETORCH for network scanning. [2][3]

APT41

APT41 used a malware variant called WIDETONE to conduct port scans on the specified subnets.[4]

Cobalt Strike

Cobalt Strike can perform port scans from an infected host.[5]

Rocke

Rocke conducted scanning for exposed TCP port 7001 as well as SSH and Redis servers.[6][7]

Mitigations

This type of attack technique cannot be easily mitigated with preventive controls since it is based on the abuse of system features.

Detection

System and network discovery techniques normally occur throughout an operation as an adversary learns the environment. Data and events should not be viewed in isolation, but as part of a chain of behavior that could lead to other activities, such as Lateral Movement, based on the information obtained.

Normal, benign system and network events from legitimate remote service scanning may be uncommon, depending on the environment and how they are used. Legitimate open port and vulnerability scanning may be conducted within the environment and will need to be deconflicted with any detection capabilities developed. Network intrusion detection systems can also be used to identify scanning activity. Monitor for process use of the networks and inspect intra-network flows to detect port scans.

References

Attachments

ID
VT0024
MITRE ID
Sub-techniques
No sub-techniques
Tactic
Discovery
Platforms
AWS
Azure
GCP
Linux
Windows
macOS
Permissions Required
Administrator
SYSTEM
User
Data Sources
Netflow/Enclave netflow
Network protocol analysis
Packet capture
Process command-line parameters
Process use of network
CAPEC ID
Version
2.1

Created: 04 January 2021

Last Modified: 04 January 2021